Episode 11: Interview with Author & Translator Kristin Osani

The Time is Right
The Time is Right
Episode 11: Interview with Author & Translator Kristin Osani
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Kristin Osani is a queer writer who lives in Kyoto, Japan where she works as a freelance Japanese-to-English video game translator when she’s not wordsmithing, working on nerdy cross-stitching, or cuddling her two cats (three if you include her husband).

Her fiction has appeared in FlashPoint SF, the Arcanist, and Ghost Orchid Press’s Beyond the Veil: Supernatural Tales of Queer Love anthology.

Kristin’s website is https://www.kristinosani.com/

Kristin shared her experience with creativity through her work as a video-game translator, her writing, cross-stitching, and drawing.

Kristin’s creative resources:

For writers struggling to create protagonists well: The Protagonist Problem.

Brandon Sanderson’s Creative Writing Lectures on Youtube

Ellen Brock‘s YouTube channel

Writing Excuses Podcast

Save the Cat!, by Blake Snyder

Take Off Your Pants!: Outline Your Books for Faster, Better Writing, by Libbie Hawker

The Emotional Craft of Fiction: How to Write the Story Beneath the Surface, by Donald Maas

Wonderbook: the Illustrated Guide to Creating Fiction, by Jeff VanderMeer

The Nebula Conference is a great place for SFF writers to connect and learn.

John suggested The Listening Book: Discovering Your Own Music, by W. A. Mathieu

Kevin mentioned** the book The Lady from the Black Lagoon, by Mallory O’Meara

**Actually, Kevin mis-titled the book repeatedly in the episode. That’s what happens when you don’t look at your notes. 🙄 Apologies to Mallory O’Meara.

Episode 9: Interview with Author & Creative Geoffreyjenn Edwards

The Time is Right
The Time is Right
Episode 9: Interview with Author & Creative Geoffreyjenn Edwards
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We continue our interviews, this time with Sci-Fi author Geoffreyjen Edwards.

We get into many aspects of creativity, including collaboration and how challenging yourself by going big rather than going home can be a successful creative strategy.

Before becoming a science-fiction writer, Geoffreyjen led a successful career as a full-time scientist. Indeed, he populates his world-building by drawing on experience in fields as diverse as astrophysics, artificial intelligence, geomatics, design, disability studies and the performing arts. Plenum: The First Book of Deo, is his first published novel. Dr. Edwards lives and works in Quebec City, Canada, and has published smaller pieces in both English and French. He also is a fashion designer. Look him up at http://www.geoffreyjenedwards.com.

Our Resources Mentioned:

Kevin talked about Art Breder: a site for making art cooperatively with artificial intelligence.

John suggested everyone bring and use their phone’s recorder to capture notes and ideas in those hot moments they occur. Also, a towel.

Geoffreyjen mentioned a site for ongoing conversations called Infinite Conversations. They are also running a publishing cooperative called Cosmos Coop.

Episode 8: Author & Multi-Creative Lily Hammer Interview

The Time is Right
The Time is Right
Episode 8: Author & Multi-Creative Lily Hammer Interview
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Our first interview with someone who isn’t us! We spoke with Lily Hammer (aka Kate), a writer, drummer, photographer, and all around creative. She talked about her approach to creativity, and how her creative efforts and interests have changed over time. She also shared how creativity helped her cope with a dark time in her life. How placing creativity at the forefront helps her be the hopeful and creative person she is today.

You can find Kate (Lily) on her website, Twitter, and Instagram.

This week’s creativity resources

Kate mentioned a TED Talk by Sir Ken Robinson during the interview. She also suggested the book Deep Work by Cal Newport.

John talked about the book Silence by John Cage.

Kevin recommended the poet Joy Harjo’s body of work. Poetry, essays, and flashes of memory. You can sample her work here and her books are here.

Exploring the Craft

Suffering the Fear of Missing Out During NaNoWriMo Prep

You don’t have to write a novel this November

The Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) hits many writers at this time of year as NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) preparations begin. We fear we don’t have any ideas, won’t have the time, or maybe just don’t want to write a novel but something else. What we’re afraid of missing is NaNo’s collective support and energy. All those write-ins, sprints, forum and Discord conversations, they provide a shared energy around writing like nothing else.

Image by StartupStockPhotos from Pixabay

But if we don’t have an idea for a novel, or don’t feel we can commit to 50,000 words in a month, we’re going to miss all that writing positivity, and that hurts.

Any words written in November are words you won’t have to write in December.

But you don’t have to write 50,000 words of a novel to participate. You don’t even have to write 50,000 words of anything. Just write. Write when you can. Soak up some of that positive energy for yourself. Any words written in November are words you won’t have to write in December.

Here are things you can do instead of writing a novel. I’ve measured them out to be the equivalent of 50,000 words, but if that’s too big a commitment, set a smaller goal. Remember, the point is to participate in the community and energy.

  • Write 2 novellas or 4 novelettes. This allows you to switch projects if you wish to get a fresh perspective, or if you get blocked on one. Getting stuck is a reason some people don’t finish their November novel. Each of these suggestions has the advantage of not getting bogged down in a single project. With these projects, you’ll also have more works ready to revise and send out or publish later.
  • Write 12 short stories. I did this one, and 6 stories ended up as the basis for a novel later, but I spent the month writing a dozen short stories ranging from 1,500 to 7,000 words. If you submit regularly to fiction markets, this can be a good way to boost your submissions in 2022.
  • Write 30 poems. This may or may not hit 50k words, but has its own reward. I know there’s National Poetry Month and NaPoWriMo in April, but why not use this one too. This is the project I’ll be doing this year and my goal will be to have 30 revised and edited poems by the end of November, so my work level will be the same as if I wrote a novel.
  • Write 50 Flash pieces. Assuming 1k words per flash.

You get the point. Yes, to officially ‘win’ NaNoWriMo you must write 50k words for a novel, but I think winning at NaNo means participating in the worldwide community of writers and sharing in the creative energy that participation creates.

During October, I’ll help your NaNoWriMo prep by publishing prompts and tips for each of these project types. Sign up for the Exploring the Craft newsletter for a monthly digest of articles. You can also join my Discord Community for writing related conversation, support, and co-working.